“Double Shift"

  by

  P.D. Williams

 

    I’m very passionate about the exciting work I get to be a part of each day here at the cloning lab. Everything about it always seems new to me. Mans’ seemingly god-like ability to create life from little more than a strand of DNA and a few tiny cells has intrigued me for a very long time. This job gives me a front-row seat to the whole miraculous process.

    I’m fortunate to be working with a small group of brilliant, visionary experts in the field of human duplication. The only drawback is that I’m considered the bottom face on the totem pole as the newest and youngest addition to the team. That means I’m assigned most of the mundane tasks, such as writing up reports, analyzing data, and so on.

     The only time I’m allowed to visit the part of the lab where the fully formed specimens are stored is near the end of my shift. My job is to check vitals and to make sure that all of the equipment is working correctly.

     The scientists keep the clones in tall, Plexiglas tubes attached to individual control panels. The cylinders contain a thick, transparent liquid that keeps the bodies suspended. Seeing them up close creeps me out a bit. Sometimes, one of them will twitch, and I half expect it to become conscious and start clawing its way out.

     Still, I can’t help but marvel at these incredible new beings. For example, there are two things that I find particularly remarkable about them. The first is how rapidly they grow. The second is the exact likeness each one bears to its donor.

    It’s time for me to begin my nightly tasks. I’m gradually working my way down the rows of encasements, noting any changes, and making necessary adjustments.

     Ah, finally, the last one. Oh no, this can’t be real. Is that me floating in there? I have to get out of here! Hey, who’s holding me? Ow! Is that a needle going into my neck? Oh God, I think I’m going to faint. I . . . feel like I’m . . . fading . . . awaaay . . .

     I’m very passionate about the exciting work I get to be a part of each day here at the cloning lab. Everything about it always seems new to me.

 

 THE END